Sports POP™ Version 3.0



PERSONAL FEEDBACK

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ContentsPage

Overview1
Performance Factors2
Character Traits3
Communication Style6
Attitudes7
Attitude Management11


This report is designed to provide you, the athlete, with insight into your strengths and how to capitalize upon them. It is divided into several sections that describe your character and your personal approach to sport, competition and other issues important in athletic success. We also intend for some of the feedback provided here to be useful in other areas of life including your education and your career.
John C. Marshall, Ph.D.


SP# PG3HDKHYNV8W for Cassandra Test on February 29, 2016

©2001, 2007 Quality Profiles Ltd.



 
 Sports POP™ Version 3.0 (SP# PG3HDKHYNV8W for Cassandra Test on February 29, 2016) Page 1 

OVERVIEW

Self Coaching Overview
(General Recommendations for Managing your Sporting and Personal Activity)

An Overview of your Sports POP™
Your overall profile shows that you would be well suited to a situation that allows you to focus on many of your personal goals within the well-defined coaching system. You would be comfortable with an organized training program that provides you with the opportunity to manage and monitor your own progress. You would fit well within in a loosely structured team environment that provided suitable feedback and a possibility of leadership roles. Individual sports could be good for you if you commit to doing the things that can make you a winner.

Competitive Nature
You are competitive with the will to win when the competition is important to you. At other times, you will be relatively relaxed and uncompetitive. You should be able to compete effectively but may relax your intensity if you believe that the competition is not tough enough.

Motivational Structure
You are motivated by challenge and will take on some difficult challenges and will derive satisfaction from meeting them.

Team Orientation
You are very independent, self reliant and often quite stubborn. Athletes with this type of profile tend to need a great deal of freedom which may occasionally conflict with the team or coach's goals.

Preferred Social Interaction Style
You are generally sociable, friendly and outgoing. You are comfortable meeting new people but may take time to build relationships with them.

Approach to Learning
You prefer to learn only what is necessary to perform your role effectively. You are likely to avoid complex technical or conceptual challenges unless they have a practical application for you.

Self Confidence
You show some signs of having a low level of self confidence at this time. Perhaps you have experienced a recent setback and are working to get your confidence back or low self confidence is an on-going issue.

Managing Pre-competition Anxiety
You report experiencing a very high level of anxiety prior to competing. This level of anxiety is very likely to have a negative effect on your performance. Please review the section in this profile that deals with this issue.


©2001, 2007 Quality Profiles Ltd.
 
 Sports POP™ Version 3.0 (SP# PG3HDKHYNV8W for Cassandra Test on February 29, 2016) Page 2 

PERFORMANCE FACTORS

COMPETITIVENESS
Extremely CompetitiveSituational
You are competitive with the will to win when the competition is important to you. At other times, you will be relatively relaxed and uncompetitive. You should be able to compete effectively but may relax your intensity if you believe that the competition is not tough enough.

Developmental Suggestions
  • Focus on your effort in competitive situations, particularly when you perceive the competition to be too weak.
  • Coaches often relate effort to playing time so work hard in each competitive situation so that you get the playing time that you deserve.
  • Review what you need to improve and what sort of help you need from the coach(es).
  • Compete against your best standards and comparable teammates when practicing to be well prepared for each contest.

MENTAL TOUGHNESS
Very Tough-mindedSensitive
Your profile is similar to individuals who can find it difficult to do well in athletics because they can become distracted by things that do not bother other athletes. You may worry about equipment and what others are thinking about you when you should be focused on your own effort. Building mental toughness will help you be a better athlete but there may be some investment of coaching time to help yourself in this area.

Developmental Suggestions
  • Remind yourself that there are two different types of critics: those who provide useful advice and those who do not. Learn to differentiate between the two types. Suggestions on how to silence the critic tactfully can be found in this report's suggestions on building self confidence.
  • Keep yourself focused on your own strengths and make certain that you are fully aware of them.
  • Learn to assess your own growth opportunities but spend more time (80%) on your strengths than on your weaknesses (20%).
  • Look for books or mentors who can provide techniques and exercises that will help you concentrate on the key issues.
  • Provide yourself with realistic challenges and reward yourself for any improvements in your performance, even minimal ones.

©2001, 2007 Quality Profiles Ltd.
 
 Sports POP™ Version 3.0 (SP# PG3HDKHYNV8W for Cassandra Test on February 29, 2016) Page 3 

CHARACTER TRAITS

SELF MANAGEMENT POTENTIAL
Initiates/Very ProactiveSeeks/Accepts Coaching
You are generally agreeable and would be described as moderately competitive, enterprising, assertive and goal oriented. You have the potential to become a self manager if you are coached in the areas of self evaluation, developing the ability to self motivate and directing yourself more effectively. You would be well suited to a structured situation where you are provided with consistent coaching and direction. You are able to develop plans that help you achieve short term goals but may have trouble staying with longer term plans. You may need to be monitored occasionally to make certain that you are doing everything that you should be doing.

Developmental Suggestions
  • Build success by doing some of the things that you have done successfully in the past. This will allow you to use and develop your existing skills.
  • Seek a mentor who is a strong self manager.
  • Write down clear achievable goals for yourself. Monitor how well you are doing reaching your goals and determine if there are things that you could do to improve your performance.
  • Evaluate your habits. Reward yourself for good habits and try to replace any questionable habits with better ones.
  • Reward your effort when you have honored the commitments that you have made.
  • Focus on developing some self evaluation and self motivation strategies.
  • Being a self manager is extremely valuable for any athlete (or in your future career).
  • It is not up to the coach to make you work hard. Effort is your responsibility.

©2001, 2007 Quality Profiles Ltd.
 
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CHARACTER TRAITS

MOTIVATIONAL STRUCTURE
Highly Challenge Oriented/ Short Term GoalsEnjoys Recognition/ Long Term Goals
You will take on very difficult challenges and will derive satisfaction from meeting them. You like to achieve your short term objectives on a regular basis while working towards your long term goals. When you focus on the goals that you set for yourself, you will be able to push yourself to achieve your best results. You would work most effectively in an environment that provides new challenges on a regular basis as well as familiar challenges that stretch your existing limits.

You are motivated by internal and, to a lesser degree, external factors. This allows you to focus on your own goals much of the time as well as responding to outside influences. As an athlete, this means that you are able to drive yourself to achieve while occasionally needing to be encouraged by outside factors such as the coach, an audience or team members.

You generally take responsibility for your own performance and will probably work hard to maintain your standards.

Developmental Suggestions
  • Review your skill development and advances in conditioning on a regular basis and reinforce any gains that you have made.
  • Seek out a training/nutritional program for that will improve your fitness and help you work toward longer term goals.
  • Commit to both your short and long term goals and review your progress regularly.
  • Consult with other goal oriented teammates who may have excellent suggestions on how to monitor and evaluate your own progress.
  • Consult with the coach(es) on your goals and learn to integrate them with the overall coaching strategy.
  • Learn how to reinforce your own efforts and progress yourself. Reward yourself when you have done well but not if you have failed to honor your self- commitments.
  • Avoid negative peers.
  • Ask yourself why you want to succeed in sport. Remind yourself of the benefits.
  • Improve by continuously evolving higher expectation levels for yourself.

©2001, 2007 Quality Profiles Ltd.
 
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CHARACTER TRAITS

TEAM ORIENTATION
Very IndependentRelies on Team Structure
You are very independent, self reliant and often quite stubborn. Athletes with this type of profile tend to need a great deal of freedom which may occasionally conflict with the team or coach's goals. You are likely to resent constant supervision and your independent nature must be channeled in a positive fashion. You should be able to perform equally well in both individual and team sports provided that your goals are the same as those of the team. Be prepared to evaluate and discuss your feedback on the existing systems and structure. You will accept supervision very reluctantly.

Developmental Suggestions
  • Your natural instinct can be to resist other people's systems but this can hurt you, particularly in a team sport. Follow the coaching strategy and integrate your ideas into it when they will enhance it without challenging the coach.
  • If you have ideas about how the team could be improved, share them with the coach(es) at the right time and in a way that is constructive.
  • Develop your own ideas about your sport into new drills that the coaching staff may be able to use in practices.
  • Work hard and commit to improving yourself in order for the coach to consider you for leadership roles.
  • Determine how you make the most positive impact on your team.

COMFORT WITH CONFLICT
Very ComfortableNeeds Coaching
Your approach to adversity is consistent with the majority of athletes. You approach adversity comfortably and handle some conflict comfortably but would prefer an environment where conflict was not too intense and not the normal state of affairs. You would benefit from some proactive approaches to prepare yourself for adversity.

Developmental Suggestions
  • Regard adversity as an opportunity for growth. Each time we face adversity rather than avoiding it, we are improving our ability to deal with adversity in all its varying forms.
  • Most conflict is something that is not directed at you personally, so try to treat it dispassionately. Personal remarks by others are not worthy of your attention.
  • Learn to be a mediator when there is relatively minor conflict during a competition.
  • Develop conflict resolution strategies that will help you be more effective when you need to assert yourself.
  • Learn to develop comfort with conflict by focusing on the concerns of the people in conflict. A calm response can help de-escalate conflict.

©2001, 2007 Quality Profiles Ltd.
 
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COMMUNICATION STYLE

SOCIAL ORIENTATION
Warm/FriendlyBuilds Relationships Gradually
You are generally sociable, friendly and outgoing. You are comfortable meeting new people but may take time to build relationships with them. You will be able to perform comfortably in an environment where there is regular contact with other people.

Developmental Suggestions
  • Make your communications skills a strength. By listening and communicating more effectively you will be able to excel in many areas including sport.
  • Look for the good in other people as you develop relationships.
  • Develop your comfort levels with the coach(es) and those teammates with whom you must interact most often.
  • Remind yourself of your strengths as a people person and work to make them even better.

APPROACH TO LEARNING
Systematic/AnalyticalLearns the Necessities
You prefer to learn only what is necessary to perform your role effectively. You are likely to avoid complex technical or conceptual challenges unless they have a practical application for you. You are more likely to reach your full athletic potential if a non-technical coaching system is in place which provides the answers when you need them. You would prefer to avoid detail and focus on the key issues.

Developmental Suggestions
  • Make certain that you have understood the essential aspects of the coaching program and your systems.
  • Focus on the essential skills that you will need to compete effectively.
  • Identify a teammate who will be willing to provide you with help if you do not understand some aspect of the coaching strategy.
  • Evaluate your training needs so that you are able to identify possible areas for growth.

©2001, 2007 Quality Profiles Ltd.
 
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ATTITUDES

The feedback in this section discusses your expressed attitudes and how they can affect your performance. It is extremely important for athletes to be confident, to have an effective approach to dealing with competition based anxiety and lifestyle management. Attitude management is important as it allows you to see the positive aspects of any situation as well as helping you work well with your coach and peers. By seeing the 'up side' of any situation, you will see opportunities to succeed rather than assuming failure is inevitable.

SELF CONFIDENCE
Feels in ControlFeels Controlled
Your responses demonstrate a low level of self confidence at this time. Perhaps you have experienced a recent setback or trauma and are working to get your confidence back or low self confidence is an ongoing issue. With this profile, it is unlikely that you will feel that you have much control over events and this may affect your performance. Self confidence is very important in sport. Learn to focus on your positive accomplishments and use the techniques at the bottom of this page.

Developmental Suggestions
  • Accept compliments with thanks.
  • Review your strengths (as an athlete and in other aspects of your life).
  • Feel good about the things you do well and reflect on your successes.
  • When you do something well, reward yourself.
  • If you struggle with some issues, do not focus on them. Look for opportunities to succeed.
  • Focus on your strengths 90% of the time and work on your growth opportunities the remaining 10% of the time.
  • Seek clarification of criticism until it is useful to you. Otherwise, learn to reject it and focus on building your own strengths rather than spending any energy on unhelpful criticism.
  • Do not engage in debate with critics. Merely accept criticism or reject it without discussion so that the critic realizes that you are disinterested in further discussion.
BUILDING SELF CONFIDENCE (Techniques that work with virtually everyone)

  • Learn to accept (and deliver) compliments by identifying a specific achievement or quality. (e.g. You are a hard worker. That was a very good shot.)
  • Silence the internal critic (learn from mistakes but do not dwell on them).
  • Silence the external critic by learning how to deal with criticism:

  • Seek clarification so that criticism becomes useful or critic stops
    Accept or reject without debate and episode will pass quickly
    Avoid the least effective approach which is to confront critic
  • Become consciously competent (aware of your strengths) first and aware of growth opportunities second
  • Learn to report the facts (I made an error) but not judge them (I am a loser).
  • Learn to market yourself by creating expectations, dressing appropriately, avoiding negativity and other positive approaches that help you to see yourself as successful.

    ©2001, 2007 Quality Profiles Ltd.
     
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    ATTITUDES

    PRE-COMPETITION ANXIETY
    Manages Anxiety Very EffectivelyCould Benefit from Coping Strategies
    You experience a very high level of anxiety prior to competing. These symptoms are the result of how you approach the competition. If you place a high level of importance on your sporting career and really want to be seen as a successful athlete, the idea that several people are going to be evaluating your performance (e.g., coach, fans, teammates) could be making you nervous. It is the same reaction that most people experience when they are asked to read a speech in front of a large crowd.

    Developmental Suggestions
    • Establish a pre-game routine that allows you to relax and take your mind off the importance of the game. This may involve isolating yourself from your teammates, as they may add to your nerves.
    • When you think about sport and the importance of being a good athlete, put it into perspective. Remember, it is just a game.
    • Picture yourself having a successful performance before the game. This will build your confidence and also take your mind off the game for a minute. Use breathing exercises in conjunction with this technique in order to relax.
    • Focus on your effort and what you can control and measure your performance by how hard you work rather than your results.

    The Basics of Managing Pre-competition Anxiety (DELI Approach)

    1. DISCOVER SOURCES OF ANXIETY

    When feeling stressed or not up to the challenge, it is important to identify the things that may be causing these feelings. A heavy workload, personal problems, conflict with others etc can create stress or anxiety. If you can discover and identify the source(s) of your anxiety you have taken the first step.

    2. EVALUATE STRATEGIES USED TO DEAL WITH PROBLEMS

    Once sources of problems are identified, you should look for coaching or advice on how to evaluate your approach to dealing with each problem. Determine if the approach is effective and whether it should be enhanced or discontinued.

    3. LEARN APPROPRIATE STRATEGIES TO DEAL WITH ISSUES

    When there is no effective strategy to deal with the issues that are causing problems, you should seek to develop new strategies that will minimize or eliminate the problems.

    4. INTEGRATE STRATEGIES INTO LIFESTYLE

    Once strategies have been developed to deal with issues such as stress, nutrition etc, they should be integrated into your lifestyle so that they become habitual.


    ©2001, 2007 Quality Profiles Ltd.
     
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    ATTITUDES

    DEFINING SUCCESS
    Personal GrowthWinning Only

    You define success from an external perspective. More specifically, you compare the performance of others to yourself, and use this as your frame of reference when determining your level of success. In doing so, you are heavily motivated to outperform others and feel most successful when you win. In addition, situations where you are able to outperform others, yet put forth only a moderate amount of effort, are especially rewarding. You would not likely be satisfied if you were a member of a losing team.

    Developmental Suggestions
    • Try to set individual performance goals that will help you achieve your overall outcome goal. In doing so, you will increase the likelihood that you will be successful and as a result draw satisfaction from the game.
    • Try to keep winning in perspective. Be gracious in defeat and take something away from the loss that will allow you to improve in the future.
    • Work on the fundamental skills of your sport so that you can increase your chances of being successful.


    SPORTSMANSHIP
    HighLow

    Your responses to these items indicate that you respect both your opponent and the rules that govern your sport. You appear to value playing by the rules and strive to be gracious in both success and defeat. You have the ability to view your opponent as an individual, rather than as an enemy. Such a disposition allows you to compete to your full potential while maintaining a sense of respect and responsibility towards your opponent.

    Developmental Suggestions
    • Demonstrate your sportsmanship and let it be part of your reputation. Your good behaviors and attitudes may influence others.
    • Let your teammates and the competition understand that no matter how hard you compete you will behave well after the competition, shaking hands acknowledging the opponent appropriately.
    ©2001, 2007 Quality Profiles Ltd.
     
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    ATTITUDES

    ATHLETIC IDENTITY
    HighLow

    Your responses indicate that you do not possess positive attitudes towards being an athlete. You are not proud of your athletic membership and would prefer to be described to others in terms that were not sports referenced.

    Developmental Suggestions
    • Focus on the positive aspects of sport such as better health and fitness, social interaction etc. You may enjoy sports more if they are less competitive and focused more on fun or social aspects.
    • Ask yourself why you are playing sports. If you do not like it, you may wish to do something more constructive with your leisure time.


    ATHLETES IN SOCIETY
    Very ImportantUnimportant

    Your answers indicate that you feel that athletes are not appreciated and respected by others. Make sure that you are aware of some of the things about athletes that should be appreciated.

    Developmental Suggestions
    • Ask other people how they feel about athletes and see how their feelings align with yours. Many people admire the commitment and energy of athletes.
    • Look for the good things about other athletes and you will recognize some of those strengths in yourself. Even people whom you may not admire have admirable traits.
    ©2001, 2007 Quality Profiles Ltd.
     
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    ATTITUDE MANAGEMENT


    The impact of an athlete's attitude is enormous. While, a positive attitude is not absolutely essential to perform effectively, it is far preferable to be around athletes and others who look for the positive or 'up side' of any issue rather than those who look at the negative side of issues. Those who are confident and look at sport in a positive light are more likely to be successful because they look for opportunities to succeed rather than reasons to fail. Attitudes are habitual ways of thinking and the best way to change a bad habit is to replace it with a good one. Managing your attitude is difficult work but there are techniques that can be used to help you.

    • Learn to identify the strengths of yourself, your own team, the opponents and even the officials.
    • Build your awareness of your own strengths (in other words, become consciously competent).
    • Emphasize and focus on your strengths 90% of the time.
    • Learn to make positive statements about yourself.
    • Learn to reflect on your personal achievements and successes. Feel good about them and remind yourself of how you achieved your successes.
    • Identify growth opportunities for yourself by deciding what you would like to improve and spend 10% of your time on improving them.
    • Set attainable goals that you can achieve.
    • Reward yourself for working hard.
    • Ignore negative statements. Reinforce positive statements by agreeing to them or asking for them to be repeated.

    ©2001, 2007 Quality Profiles Ltd.
     






    Sports POP™ Version 3.0



    COACHING REPORT

    Click here to view your CareerManagementPro™ report

    ContentsPage

    Overview1
    Snapshot of Sports POP™2
    Performance Factors3
    Character Traits4
    Communication Style7
    Attitudes8
    Attitude Management12
    Emotional Quotient13
    Sports POP™ Scores14
    Responses from Opinions Section15


    This Coaching Report is designed to help a coach gain insight into the development and growth of an athlete. It is divided into several sections which describe the athlete's character and attitudes and provide suggestions on how to coach and mentor the athlete so that he/she may achieve his/her fullest potential both in sport and in life.
    John C. Marshall, Ph.D.


    SP# PG3HDKHYNV8W for Cassandra Test on February 29, 2016

    ©2001, 2007 Quality Profiles Ltd.



     
     Sports POP™ Version 3.0 (SP# PG3HDKHYNV8W for Cassandra Test on February 29, 2016) Page 1 

    OVERVIEW

    Cassandra's overall profile shows that he/she would be well suited to a situation that balances well-defined coach objectives with his/her own goals. He/She is independent and reasonably motivated. He/She would be comfortable with training and coaching programs that provide him/her with the opportunity to manage and monitor his/her own progress. Cassandra's best fit would be in a modestly structured team environment that provides suitable feedback and a path to leadership roles.

    Competitive Nature
    Cassandra is occasionally competitive with the will to win when the competition is important to him/her. At other times, he/she will be relatively relaxed and uncompetitive. Cassandra should be able to compete effectively but may relax his/her intensity if he/she believes that the competition is not tough enough.

    Motivational Structure
    He/She will take on very difficult challenges and will derive satisfaction from meeting them.

    Team Orientation
    He/She is very independent, self reliant and often quite stubborn. Athletes with this type of profile tend to need a great deal of freedom which may occasionally conflict with the team or coach's goals.

    Preferred Social Interaction Style
    Cassandra is generally sociable, friendly and outgoing. He/She is comfortable meeting new people but may take time to build relationships with them.

    Approach to Learning
    He/She prefers to learn only what is necessary to perform his/her role effectively. He/She is likely to avoid complex technical or conceptual challenges unless they have a practical application for him/her.

    Self Confidence
    Cassandra shows signs of having a very low level of self confidence at this time. Perhaps he/she has experienced a recent setback or trauma and is working to get his/her confidence back or low self confidence is an ongoing issue.

    Managing Pre-competition Anxiety
    Cassandra is currently experiencing a very high level of anxiety prior to competing. This level of anxiety is very likely to have a negative effect on his/her performance. Please review the section in this profile that deals with this issue.


    ©2001, 2007 Quality Profiles Ltd.
     
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    Snapshot of Sport Profile


    COMPETITIVENESS
    Extremely CompetitiveSituational

    MENTAL TOUGHNESS
    Very Tough-mindedSensitive

    SELF MANAGEMENT POTENTIAL
    Initiates/Very ProactiveSeeks/Accepts Coaching

    MOTIVATIONAL STRUCTURE
    Highly Challenge Oriented/ Short Term GoalsEnjoys Recognition/ Long Term Goals

    TEAM ORIENTATION
    Very IndependentRelies on Team Structure

    COMFORT WITH CONFLICT
    Very ComfortableNeeds Coaching

    SOCIAL ORIENTATION
    Warm/FriendlyBuilds Relationships Gradually

    APPROACH TO LEARNING
    Systematic/AnalyticalLearns the Necessities

    SELF CONFIDENCE
    Feels in ControlFeels Controlled

    PRE-COMPETITION ANXIETY
    Manages Anxiety Very EffectivelyCould Benefit from Coping Strategies

    DEFINING SUCCESS
    Personal GrowthWinning Only

    ©2001, 2007 Quality Profiles Ltd.
     
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    PERFORMANCE FACTORS

    COMPETITIVENESS
    Extremely CompetitiveSituational
    Cassandra is occasionally competitive with the will to win when the competition is important to him/her. At other times, he/she will be relatively relaxed and uncompetitive. Cassandra should be able to compete effectively but may relax his/her intensity if he/she believes that the competition is not tough enough.

    Coaching Suggestions
    • Keep Cassandra focused on his/her effort in competitive situations, particularly when he/she perceives the competition to be too weak.
    • Relate playing time to effort in each competitive situation.
    • Consult with him/her on what he/she needs to improve and what sort of help he/she needs from the coach(es).
    • Challenge him/her frequently by matching him/her with athletes with comparable ability.


    MENTAL TOUGHNESS
    Very Tough-mindedSensitive
    Cassandra's profile is similar to individuals who often find it difficult to do well in athletics because they can become distracted by things that do not bother other athletes. He/She may worry about equipment and what others are thinking about him/her when it is not important. Building mental toughness will help Cassandra be a better athlete but there may be some investment of coaching time to help him/her in this area.

    Coaching Suggestions
    • Help him/her understand that critics are often just that and are very often less capable than he/she is.
    • Keep him/her focused on his/her own strengths and make certain that he/she is fully aware of them.
    • Use direct criticism very sparingly with Cassandra. Ask him/her to assess his/her own growth opportunities rather than pointing them out to him/her.
    • Provide Cassandra with appropriate strategies to improve his/her focus.
    • Provide him/her with realistic challenges and praise or otherwise reinforce any improvements in performance, even minimal ones.

    ©2001, 2007 Quality Profiles Ltd.
     
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    CHARACTER TRAITS

    SELF MANAGEMENT POTENTIAL
    Initiates/Very ProactiveSeeks/Accepts Coaching
    Cassandra would be described as moderately competitive, enterprising, assertive and goal oriented. He/She has the potential to become a better self manager if he/she is coached in the areas of self evaluation, developing the ability to self motivate and directing him/herself more effectively. He/She would be well suited to a structured situation where he/she is provided with consistent coaching and direction. He/She is able to develop plans that help him/her achieve short term goals but may have trouble staying with longer term plans. Cassandra may need to be monitored to make certain that he/she is following the coaching program.

    Coaching Suggestions
    • Help Cassandra to develop in a role which will build on the strengths that he/she has developed in his/her previous experience.
    • Match him/her with a mentor who is a strong self manager.
    • Schedule a regular progress review procedure and stick to your schedule.
    • Help him/her manage him/herself more effectively by varying the amount of guidance and direction he/she receives until he/she is delivering consistent effort.
    • Reinforce his/her effort when he/she honors the commitments that he/she makes to the coach, the team and him/herself.
    • Provide Cassandra with some self evaluation and self motivation strategies.
    • Assure that he/she understands the importance of an athlete being a self manager.
    Developmental Questions
    • How do you make certain that you are achieving your daily goals?
    • How do you review your progress as an athlete? How often?
    • What do you do when you have completed all your tasks for the day?
    • How often do you like to review your progress with the coach?
    • What are some of the things you would like to work on this season?
    • What do you think you need to do to achieve your goals?
    • What are you prepared to do?
    • Will you do these things?

    ©2001, 2007 Quality Profiles Ltd.
     
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    CHARACTER TRAITS

    MOTIVATIONAL STRUCTURE
    Highly Challenge Oriented/ Short Term GoalsEnjoys Recognition/ Long Term Goals
    Cassandra will take on very difficult challenges and will derive satisfaction from meeting them. He/She can achieve most goals that he/she sets for him/herself and he/she will generally be found pushing him/herself to achieve the best results that he/she can. He/She likes to work toward long term objectives while achieving short term goals on a regular basis. He/She would work most effectively in an environment that provides new challenges on a regular basis as well as familiar challenges that stretch his/her existing limits.

    He/She is motivated by internal and, to a lesser degree, external factors. This allows him/her to focus on his/her own goals much of the time as well as responding to outside influences. As an athlete, this means that he/she is able to drive him/herself to achieve while occasionally needing to be encouraged by outside factors such as the coach, an audience or team members.

    Cassandra will do things for his/her own reasons most of the time but will also respond to motivational strategies from his/her peers and coaches. A coach who is an effective motivator will help Cassandra some of the time but he/she should be encouraged to develop self motivation strategies.

    He/She generally takes responsibility for his/her own performance and will probably work hard to maintain his/her standards.

    Coaching Suggestions
    • Review his/her progress and challenge him/her on a regular basis.
    • Challenge Cassandra with goals that he/she can achieve on a regular basis.
    • Provide a training/nutritional program for Cassandra that will improve his/her fitness and help him/her work toward longer term goals.
    • Ask him/her to commit to both short and long term goals and consult with him/her regularly about his/her progress.
    • Match him/her with a more goal oriented teammate who will help him/her monitor and evaluate his/her own progress.
    • Consult with him/her on his/her goals and help him/her to integrate them with your overall coaching strategy.
    • Praise effort and results but help him/her to learn how to reinforce his/her own efforts and progress him/herself.
    • Provide Cassandra with tools to deal with negative peers.
    • Ask him/her to give you some insights into why he/she is eager to succeed in sport. CS5.10=Focus on developing new skills as well as gains in conditioning.
    Developmental Questions
    • Describe some of your recent achievements. What are you doing to build on them?
    • Were they achieved over a short or long period of time?
    • What are some of your immediate goals? What do you need from the coaches to help reach your goals?
    • How can your drive to succeed help the coaching staff?
    • Do you have any teammates that you would like to compete against in practice?
    • Describe how you performed on a recent, challenging competition.
    • What helped you do well? What factors hindered you?
    • What is the ideal duration of a practice?
    • Describe a situation where you set challenging goals for yourself. What was the outcome? What did you learn from it?

    ©2001, 2007 Quality Profiles Ltd.
     
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    CHARACTER TRAITS

    TEAM ORIENTATION
    Very IndependentRelies on Team Structure
    Cassandra is very independent, self reliant and often quite stubborn. Athletes with this type of profile tend to need a great deal of freedom which may occasionally conflict with the team or coach's goals. He/She is likely to resent constant supervision and his/her independent nature must be channeled in a positive fashion. He/She should be able to perform equally well in both individual and team sports provided that his/her goals are the same as those of the team. Be prepared to evaluate and discuss his/her feedback on the existing systems and structure. He/She will accept supervision very reluctantly.

    Coaching Suggestions
    • When Cassandra is performing well, give him/her as much freedom as you can within your guidelines.
    • Consult with him/her on team matters when it seems appropriate.
    • Encourage him/her to develop new drills to use in practices.
    • Develop him/her in a leadership role if his/her performance and work ethic are reaching the levels that have been set for him/her.


    COMFORT WITH CONFLICT
    Very ComfortableNeeds Coaching
    Cassandra is typical of athletes who are comfortable with some level of adversity and conflict but would be most at ease in an environment where conflict was neither the normal state of affairs nor too intense. He/She will be able to deal with some conflict and adversity but would benefit from some stretching of his/her limits. Strategies that will help resolve conflict would help him/her as well.

    Coaching Suggestions
    • Help him/her regard adversity as an opportunity for growth. By facing adversity on a regular basis, we all can learn to improve our ability to deal with it when it re-occurs in any form.
    • Work on strategies that will focus him/her on positive outcomes when faced with challenges or apparently impossible situations.
    • Focus him/her on becoming more comfortable with adversity by stretching his/her limits gradually while retaining his/her composure.
    • Help him/her approach conflict in an impersonal manner. If he/she understands that most disagreements are not about personalities, he/she will be able to deal with this sort of adversity more effectively. Also help him/her learn to ignore personal remarks that are not worthy of his/her attention.

    ©2001, 2007 Quality Profiles Ltd.
     
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    COMMUNICATION STYLE

    SOCIAL ORIENTATION
    Warm/FriendlyBuilds Relationships Gradually
    Cassandra is generally sociable, friendly and outgoing. He/She is comfortable meeting new people but may take time to build relationships with them. He/She will be able to perform comfortably in an environment where there is regular contact with other people.

    Coaching Suggestions
    • Consult with Cassandra on whether there are any specific communications skills that he/she may wish to develop. Areas such as confidence building, listening and communicating more effectively are often very helpful.
    • Let him/her develop relationships at his/her own pace.
    • Coach him/her to feel comfortable with the teammates with whom he/she must interact most often.
    • Provide specific feedback on the communications skills where he/she needs help. Build his/her confidence, help him/her become a good listener, mentor him/her on expressing him/herself more effectively.CS4.1=Build on Cassandra's strengths with other people by inviting him/her to interact with teammates, officials and other peers.


    APPROACH TO LEARNING
    Systematic/AnalyticalLearns the Necessities
    Cassandra prefers to learn only what is necessary to perform his/her role effectively. He/She is likely to avoid complex technical or conceptual challenges unless they have a practical application for him/her. He/She is more likely to reach his/her full athletic potential if a non-technical coaching system is in place which provides the answers when he/she needs them. He/She would prefer to avoid detail and focus on the key issues.

    Coaching Suggestions
    • Make certain that Cassandra has understood the essential aspects of the coaching program and your systems.
    • Focus his/her on the essential skills that he/she will need to compete effectively.
    • Match him/her with teammates who understand and follow your programs.
    • Consult with him/her on his/her training needs so that he/she will learn to evaluate possible areas for growth.
    Developmental Questions
    • How comfortable are you developing your own training schedule? How do you review your progress?
    • What do you do when you have completed all your tasks for the day?
    • How often do you like to review your progress with the coach?
    • What are some of the things you would like to work on this season?
    • What do you think you need to do to achieve your goals?
    • What are you prepared to do?
    • Will you do these things?

    ©2001, 2007 Quality Profiles Ltd.
     
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    ATTITUDES

    The feedback in this section discusses Cassandra's attitudes and how they can affect performance. Feelings of confidence (particularly as they relate to his/her effectiveness in sport) are extremely important to the athlete. Managing pre-competition anxiety is also essential to the athlete. This section will help you understand how Cassandra approaches these issues and provide some suggestions that may assist you as his/her coach.

    SELF CONFIDENCE
    Feels in ControlFeels Controlled
    Cassandra shows signs of having a very low level of self confidence at this time. Perhaps he/she has experienced a recent setback or trauma and is working to get his/her confidence back or low self confidence is an ongoing issue. With this profile, it is unlikely that he/she will feel that he/she has much control over events and this may affect his/her performance. Self confidence is very important in sport. It can be re-built by focusing on the positive accomplishments of the individual.

    Coaching Suggestions
    • Seek to understand his/her reasons for lack of confidence and develop a plan to address them.
    • Remind him/her of his/her strengths (as an athlete and in other venues).
    • Offer him/her the support provided by the coaches and his/her peers.
    • When he/she does something well, reinforce by acknowledging and providing approval.
    • If he/she struggles with some issues, do not focus on them. Help him/her by providing opportunities to succeed.
    • Address areas for personal growth only after focusing on strengths.
    Developmental Questions
    • Do you focus on your weaknesses a lot? What are the advantages of this?
    • What are some of your strengths as an athlete? (Try to get as many strengths as possible)
    • List some of your strengths? How can you focus on your strengths more often?
    • What are the things that you have done well in the past?
    • What is one of the things that you would like to improve? Is it more important than your existing strengths? Do you have a plan to develop this area? Do you need my help?
    BUILDING SELF CONFIDENCE (Techniques that work with virtually everyone)

      • Compliment the individual by identifying a specific achievement or quality. (e.g., You are a hard worker. That was a very good shot.)
      • Help silence the critic (teach to learn from mistakes but not to dwell on them).
      • Help the individual be consciously competent as well as aware of growth opportunities.
      • Help the individual learn to accept compliments.
      • Help the person learn to report (I made an error) but not judge (I am a loser).
      • Teach how to deal with criticism:

      • Seek clarification so that criticism becomes useful or critic stops
        Accept or reject without debate and episode will pass quickly
        Avoid the least effective approach which is to confront critic
      • Coach individual to market self through creating expectations, dressing appropriately, avoiding negativity and other positive approaches that help them see themselves as successful.

      ©2001, 2007 Quality Profiles Ltd.
       
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      ATTITUDES

      PRE-COMPETITION ANXIETY
      Manages Anxiety Very EffectivelyCould Benefit from Coping Strategies
      Cassandra reports a very high level of anxiety prior to competing. Consequently, his/her pre-competitive state anxiety is at a level that may hurt his/her performance. These symptoms may result from Cassandra fearing that he/she will be criticized by those watching the competition. Cassandra may doubt that he/she possesses the talents necessary to be successful and may feel that he/she may be judged as incompetent. This could be a result of Cassandra placing a high level of importance on his/her performance. Threats to his/her self-image could make him/her feel highly anxious before competing.

      Coaching Suggestions
      • Help Cassandra establish a pre-game routine that allows him/her to relax and take his/her mind off the importance of the game. This may involve isolating him/her from his/her teammates, as they may add to Cassandra's nerves.
      • Focus Cassandra on working hard rather than the result. Demonstrate to him/her that you are happy when he/she competes hard no matter what the outcome.
      • Avoid putting too much pressure on him/her to perform.
      • Create a fail-proof practice environment where Cassandra can repeatedly be successful. This may require that you reduce the level of difficulty at first, and then progressively move towards game-like conditions.
      • Focus Cassandra on realistic outcomes. Remind him/her that losing is "not the end of the world". A major contributor to an athlete's level of anxiety is using unrealistic and irrational thought processes.
      • Avoid giving him/her additional assignments or stretching his/her limits until he/she is managing his/her energy well.
      • Recommend that Cassandra consult with a sport psychologist. These people have specific training in this area and will be able to help Cassandra regulate his/her level of pre-competitive state anxiety.

      THE BASICS OF LIFESTYLE MANAGEMENT (DELI Approach)

      1. DISCOVER SOURCES OF PROBLEMS

      When feeling under stress or not up to the challenges being faced, it is important to identify the things that may be causing these feelings. A heavy workload, personal problems, conflict with others etc can create stress and identifying the source of stress is the first step.

      2. EVALUATE STRATEGIES USED TO DEAL WITH PROBLEMS

      Once sources of problems are identified, the individual should be coached on evaluating his/her approach to dealing with each problem. Determine if the approach is effective and whether it should be enhanced or discontinued.

      3. LEARN APPROPRIATE STRATEGIES TO DEAL WITH ISSUES

      When there is no effective strategy to deal with the issues that are causing problems, the individual should be coached to develop strategies that will minimize or eliminate the problems.

      4. INTEGRATE STRATEGIES INTO LIFESTYLE

      Once strategies have been developed to deal with issues such as stress, nutrition etc, they should be integrated into lifestyle so that they become habitual.


      ©2001, 2007 Quality Profiles Ltd.
       
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      ATTITUDES

      DEFINING SUCCESS
      Personal GrowthWinning Only

      Cassandra defines success from an external perspective. In other words, he/she compares his/her own performance with the performance of others and uses this information to determine whether or not he/she was successful. As a result, winning is often the only thing that matters. Moreover, because winning is so important to him/her, it is very possible that he/she will use any tactic to gain some sort of performance advantage. Cassandra is more likely to accept challenges that he/she feels that he/she can win and may not always set challenging goals for him/herself. Finally, because Cassandra perceives winning to be of primary importance, he/she may be more likely to drop out of sport during prolonged periods of failure.

      Coaching Suggestions
      • Help Cassandra put winning into perspective and to develop personal performance goals from which he/she can draw satisfaction. This will help remove negative feelings in the event of a loss.
      • Set challenging goals for Cassandra so that he/she must put forth an adequate amount of effort to achieve them.
      • Focus on building [Cassandra's fundamental skills so he/she will not need to rely on cheating and other illegal tactics as a way of increasing his/her chances of winning.
      • Watch for signs of self-handicapping (e.g., I have a stomach ache) or social loafing (e.g., letting others do all the work) when he/she is faced with difficult tasks. People sometimes try these techniques where the likelihood for success is low, so that they can deflect the blame for the failure.


      SPORTSMANSHIP
      HighLow

      Cassandra's responses indicate that he/she respects both his/her opponent and the rules that govern his/her sport. He/She appears to value playing by the rules and perceives him/herself to be gracious at all times whatever the results were. Cassandra has the ability to view his/her opponent as an individual rather than as an enemy. Such a disposition allows him/her to compete to his/her full potential while maintaining a sense of respect and responsibility towards his/her opponent.

      Coaching Suggestions
      • Cassandra can be a role model for team members in this area. Let him/her know that you appreciate his/her leadership.
      ©2001, 2007 Quality Profiles Ltd.
       
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      ATTITUDES

      ATHLETIC IDENTITY
      HighLow

      Cassandra's responses indicate that he/she does not possess positive attitudes towards being an athlete. Cassandra is not proud of his/her athletic membership and does not like to be described to others as an athlete. Overall, Cassandra may not even like to participate in sport or see much meaning in it.

      Coaching Suggestions
      • Because his/her responses to questions about sport indicate that he/she is uncertain about whether it has much significance for him/her, he/she may benefit from being able to see the joys of building new skills and lasting friendships.
      • Look for external forces that may be contributing to these feelings and help where you can without becoming intrusive.


      ATHLETES IN SOCIETY
      Very ImportantUnimportant

      His/Her answers indicate that he/she feels that athletes are not appreciated and respected by others. Encourage him/her to identify some of the things about athletes that should be appreciated.

      Coaching Suggestions
      • Ask Cassandra to examine some of the strengths that athletes have that may not be present in the general public. The willingness to train hard and work towards goals are things that many people who criticize athletes do not have themselves.
      ©2001, 2007 Quality Profiles Ltd.
       
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      ATTITUDE MANAGEMENT


      The impact of an athlete's attitude is enormous. While, a positive attitude is not absolutely essential to perform effectively, it is far preferable to be around athletes and others who look for the positive or up side of any issue rather than those who look at the negative side of issues. Those who are confident and look at sport in a positive light are more likely to be successful because they look for opportunities to succeed rather than reasons to fail. Attitudes are habitual ways of thinking and the best way to change a bad habit is to replace it with a good one. Managing an athlete's attitude is difficult work for a coach but there are techniques that can be used to help.

      • Always focus on the strengths of own team, opponents and even officials
      • Build the athlete's awareness of own strengths (conscious competence)
      • Emphasize and focus on individual's strengths 90% of the time.
      • Encourage individual to make positive statements about self.
      • Encourage individual to reflect on personal achievements and successes.
      • Let athlete identify growth opportunities for self by asking if there are any things he or she would like to develop.
      • Set attainable goals to help athlete achieve and grow in confidence.
      • Ask for individual's view of strengths of self, teammates, coaches, organization etc.
      • Always reinforce effort.
      • Ignore negative statements. Reinforce positive statements by agreeing to them or asking for them to be repeated.

      ©2001, 2007 Quality Profiles Ltd.
       
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      EMOTIONAL QUOTIENT

      The ability to understand and apply emotional information about ourselves and others effectively.

      SELF AWARENESS I: MOOD LABELING
      Labels feelings and emotions as they are happeningDoes not label feelings and emotions as they are happening
       A measure of a person's ability to accurately label personal feelings and emotions.

      SELF AWARENESS II: MOOD MONITORING
      High monitoringOptimal monitoringLow monitoring
       A measure of the amount of energy a person puts forth in monitoring his/her own feelings and emotions.

      SELF CONTROL
      Demonstrates good self controlLow control over impulses and negative emotions
       A measure of a person's restraint as it relates to one's control over his/her impulses, emotions, and/or desires.

      MANAGING EMOTIONAL INFLUENCES
      PerseveresFocus can change
       A measure of a person's ability to manage emotional influences that would prevent him/her from taking those actions that he/she believes are necessary in dealing effectively with everyday situations and/or meeting personal goals.

      EMPATHY
      Recognizes emotions in othersLow awareness of emotions of others
       A measure of a person's ability to understand the feelings and emotions of others.

      SOCIAL JUDGMENT
      Uses knowledge of the emotions of others in decision-makingDoes not factor in the emotions of others in decision-making
       A measure of a person's ability to make appropriate decisions in social situations based on the emotional states of others.

      OVERALL
      Understands & uses emotional informationRelies on non- emotional information
       An overall measure of how well a person understands emotional information and uses it effectively.

      ©2001, 2007 Quality Profiles Ltd.
       
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      SPORTSPRO™ SCORES


      ENTERPRISING POTENTIAL (EP)
       
      EP
      1
        STRONG AVERAGE MARGINAL                            WEAK

      ACHIEVEMENT POTENTIAL (AP)
       
      AP
      9
        HIGH SENSE OF URGENCY CONTINGENT ON THE SITUATION RELAXED / CALM

      INDEPENDENCE POTENTIAL (IP)
       
      IP
      25
        VERY INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENCE ORIENTED TEAM ORIENTED

      COMFORT WITH CONFLICT
       
      CWC
      0
        VERY COMFORTABLE NEEDS COACHING

      EMOTIONAL QUOTIENT
       
      EQ
      38
        HIGH EMOTIONAL AWARENESS RELIANCE ON NON-EMOTIONAL INFORMATION

      PREDICTOR SCORE (PS)
       
      PS
      29
        VERY STRONG                    ;    STRONG AVERAGE BELOW AVERAGE                  &nbs p; CAUTION

      SCORES
       
      Enterprising People Oriented Achievement Oriented Independent

      Power Scores 80 1 82 91
      Neutr Scores 79 -7 73 66

      Acquiescent Investigative Relaxed Team Oriented
       
      1 79 9 25 29
      EP BL AP IP PS
      OPINIONS
       
            - 5      3      - 2      9      51
            SD      PCA & nbsp;    AAS      UC     & nbsp;SPM
      ©2001, 2007 Quality Profiles Ltd.
       
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      Responses from Opinions Section

      1=Not at All like me2=Generally not Like me3=Somewhat like me4=Moderately like me5=Definitely like me

      1.  self managing (5)
      2.  disliking pressure (5)
      3.  talkative (2)
      4.  curious (5)
      5.  argumentative (5)
      6.  calm (2)
      7.  innovator (5)
      8.  diplomatic (5)
      9.  self-confident (2)
      10.  uninvolved (1)
      11.  outgoing (5)
      12.  reflective (1)
      13.  eager (1)
      14.  steady (1)
      15.  persistent (1)
      16.  painstaking (1)
      17.  outspoken (1)
      18.  mild mannered (1)
      19.  humorous (1)
      20.  precise (1)
      21.  irritable (1)
      22.  patient (2)
      23.  unconventional (1)
      24.  obliging (1)
      25.  enterprising (1)
      26.  wanting security (5)
      27.  socially skilled (1)
      28.  logical (1)
      29.  risk taker (2)
      30.  methodical (5)
      31.  persevering (5)
      32.  devoted (5)
      33.  plenty of fight (5)
      34.  modest (5)
      35.  making friends (5)
      36.  analytical (5)
      37.  striving to improve (2)
      38.  predictable (5)
      39.  strong-minded (1)
      40.  anxious to please (5)
      41.  individualistic (1)
      42.  thoughtful (1)
      43.  liked by others (1)
      44.  realistic (1)
      45.  dissatisfied (1)
      46.  unchanging (1)
      47.  independent (5)
      48.  thorough (1)
       
      49.  venturesome (3)
      50.  considerate (4)
      51.  lively (5)
      52.  factual (5)
      53.  changeable (5)
      54.  steadfast (4)
      55.  disliking supervision (5)
      56.  easy on others (1)
      57.  opportunistic (3)
      58.  careful (2)
      59.  genial (2)
      60.  working well alone (4)
      61.  liking variety (3)
      62.  dependable (5)
      63.  stubborn (4)
      64.  systematic (5)
      65.  pushing for results (1)
      66.  cautious (3)
      67.  affable (5)
      68.  direct (1)
      69.  plenty of drive (5)
      70.  composed (1)
      71.  decisive (2)
      72.  following the rules (5)
      73.  will to win (2)
      74.  avoiding conflicts (5)
      75.  mixing with people (2)
      76.  interested in ideas (5)
      77.  active (2)
      78.  unruffled (5)
      79.  taking initiative (1)
      80.  willing to help (5)
      81.  assertive (2)
      82.  caring about others (5)
      83.  liking people (2)
      84.  quiet (5)
      85.  disliking routine (2)
      86.  constant (5)
      87.  resisting pressure (1)
      88.  agreeable (2)
      89.  ambitious (5)
      90.  good listener (2)
      91.  happy (5)
      92.  disciplined (2)
      93.  restless (5)
      94.  faithful (2)
      95.  disliking detail (5)
      96.  co-operative (1)
      ©2001, 2007 Quality Profiles Ltd.